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Tiredness while driving

Tiredness while driving

Today's bustling way of life and work affects our driving ability. We often sit in our car exhausted, tired and sleepy, which can lead to severe traffic accidents caused by tiredness.

Regardless of the initial elan, driving or traveling desire, driving tiredness usually occurs after two hours of driving, usually between the second and seventh hours of driving, or after passing 200 to 500 kilometres, depending on what type of road we drive.

Tiredness causes many bodily changes, such as changes in brain activity, slowing heart rate, and suboptimal eye movement. Tiredness while driving is a different form of tiredness that is characterized by sleepiness, reduced attention, and weaker control over the vehicle, which results in variations in speed and meandering on the road. The most dangerous aspect of this is that drivers are mostly unaware of how tired they really are when they sit in the car. As a result, a phenomenon called micro-sleep might occur. Micro-sleep is a short episode of sleep that can last from a fraction of a second up to thirty seconds and can happen at any time, unbeknownst to the person who is micro-sleeping. The person is usually unaware that he or she has fallen asleep and feels awake all the time, or merely thinks that her thoughts vanished for a moment. Loss of (total) consciousness, even for such a short time period, can have serious consequences while driving.

Regardless of the initial elan a driver might feel when sitting behind the wheel, driving tiredness typically occurs after two hours of driving, usually between the second and seventh hours of driving, or after passing 200 to 500 kilometres, depending on what type of road we drive. A demanding road and difficult driving conditions substantially affect the increase of tiredness level.

Most people who experience tiredness while driving consume coffee for awakening, but this is merely a short-term fix. We bring you some tips to help mitigate tiredness while driving:

  • Conversation with passengers
  • Listening to music
  • Refreshing drinks
  • Short breaks
  • Exercise

Finally, if you feel very tired, it is best to stop driving. Turn right along the road and take a nap in the car or somewhere else for at least half an hour. Then you can continue to drive safely.

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